Kidney Stones FAQ

1. What is a kidney stone?

2. Do I have a kidney stone?

3. What are the symptoms of a kidney stone?

4. Do all kidney stones cause pain?

5. What causes a kidney stone?

6. Can I take something to dissolve my kidney stone?

7. How do kidney stones form?

8. Was it something I ate/drank?

9. Can I prevent another kidney stone?

10. What are the treatment options for my kidney stone?

11. What are the signs of a kidney stone emergency?

12. How long does it take to form a kidney stone?

13. What is my risk of forming another kidney stone?

14. Am I going to be able to pass my (insert size here) stone?

15. Which surgery should I choose?

16. What is a ureteral stent?

17. How is a stent placed?

18. How is a stent removed?

19. Why do I have pain after my stent was removed?

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1. What is a kidney stone?

Kidney stones are the formation of crystalline structures in the urinary tract (which includes the kidneys, ureters, and bladder). These stones can cause pain, infection, and kidney damage. Stones can be small, from 1 mm to very large, filling up an entire kidney. For pictures of stones, see our stone gallery.

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2. Do I have a kidney stone?

For patients experiencing their first stone episode, the pain can be so severe and sudden that it stops them in their tracks. Without prior knowledge of what a stone episode feels like, it can be confusing and frightening to go through this amount of discomfort, which is usually described as the worst pain someone has ever experienced. A trip to the emergency room is usually required to make the diagnosis and provide treatment for an active kidney stone. X-rays, usually a CT scan, can be used to confirm that a stone is present.

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3. What are the symptoms of passing a kidney stone?

Stone pain is often described as stabbing and extremely severe. Women commonly say that it is worst than having a child. The pain can start in the upper back (flank) and then migrate to the abdomen and groin. Changing positions does not help relieve the pain. The pain of a kidney stone is primarily due to blockage of the urine drainage coming down the small tube called the “ureter” that connects a kidney to the bladder. See a diagram of the urinary system.

It is thought that the increased pressure stretches the kidney and ureter, causing the pain. This is why stone pain can come and go in waves, as the drainage tube is periodically blocked by the stone trying to make its way out. As the stone moves further down the tube, the pain experienced moves down the body. Other symptoms common during a stone episode include seeing blood in the urine, nausea & vomiting, and feeling the urge to urinate. Once a stone is passed and makes it way out of the ureter tube and into the bladder, most patients describe a sensation of instant relief as the blockage and pressure is relieved. However, stones can take from days to weeks to pass. See a diagram of locations where stones typically get obstructed.

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4. Do all kidney stones cause pain?

Most doctors feel that kidney stones only cause pain if they are blocking the ureter and trying to pass down towards the bladder. Stones that are not obstructing, such as those located in the kidney’s calyxes, are generally thought to be non-painful. This explains why some patients can have extremely large stones filling up their entire kidney with no or minimal pain.

However, it does appear that some non-obstructing stones can cause pain because of either blockage of small tubular structures in the kidney itself (the collecting tubules) or for other unclear reasons. Supporting this view is a recent medical journal article suggesting that the treatment of small non-obstructing “papillary” stones may provide pain relief. (Gdor et al, Multi-institutional assessment of ureteroscopic laser papillotomy for chronic pain associated with papillary calcifications, J Urol 2011) Additionally, testimonials from many kidney stone patients (including a urologist with a personal history of kidney stones) suggest that some  non-obstructing stones can cause pain.

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5. What causes a kidney stone?

Kidney stones affect 1 out of 10 people during their lifetimes. They are more common than most people realize. There are many factors that determines whether someone will develop a stone with some being under a person’s control while others are out of their hands.

Common factors influencing kidney stone development:

  • Gender: Men are two to three times more likely to form stones
  • Race: Caucasians have the highest stone rates as compared to other races
  • Age: Stones occur most commonly between the 20s to 50s
  • Geography: Those living in hot dry environments are at increased risk. Additionally, those living in the Southeastern United States appear to be at particularly increased risk of forming stones.
  • Seasonal climate: Stone development is more common during the summer months due to dehydration from higher summertime temperatures and possibly also from higher concentrations of calcium in urine resulting from increased sun exposure which can lead to higher levels of Vit D production.
  • Occupation: Those working in jobs with exposure to climate and dehydration are more prone to stone development.
  • Body weight: There are higher rates of stones in those with increased weight and body mass index.
  • Genetics and medical conditions: Individuals with a history of some conditions, such as medullary sponge kidney or renal tubular acidosis are prone to forming stones. Those with a personal family history of stones may have two to three times increased risk of forming stones.
  • Infections: Chronic urinary tract infections can lead to the development of infection related stones, known as struvite stones.

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6. Can I take something to dissolve my kidney stone?

Patients often ask whether something can be taken to dissolve their stones. Unfortunately, the most common stone types (calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate, accounting for 80% of all stones) cannot be dissolved with medications.

However, in patients with uric acid stones, which account for 5-7% of stones, medication (potassium citrate) can be successfully given to dissolve the stones, helping them to pass and preventing them from re-developing.

Patients with the less common cystine type stones (1-3% of stone formers) can also benefit from potassium citrate and water intake to help dissolve their stones. Cystine stone formers additionally can be treated with D-penicillamine or α-mercaptopropionylglycine to help bind and dissolve their stones.

Finally, patients with struvite, or “infection”, stones were in the past more commonly treated with hemiacidrin irrigation solution which is dripped directly onto stones through a tube placed directly into the kidney. However, because of potentially serious side effects from this medication and the difficulty in giving it, this type of therapy is now uncommon.

Learn more about different types of stones.

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7. How do kidney stones form?

There are many factors that lead to the development of kidney stones. For details and a visual time-line of the steps in stone formation, see: How do stones form?

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8. Was it something I ate/drank?

In most patients, we find diet is not the main reason that caused a stone to form in the first place. Other important factors also play a role in determining whether someone is “prone” to forming stones. In other words, a non-stone-former can eat the exact same diet as a stone-former and never get stones.

That said, diet can play an important role in the prevention of future stones. The three most important dietary factors for most stone formers to modify in reducing their risk of future stones are to increase total fluid intake, decrease sodium intake, and and decrease protein (meat) intake.

Some commonly held beliefs of  foods that promote stones including cola, tea, coffee, and calcium intake have not been shown to be true. In fact, research suggests that increasing tea, coffee, and calcium intake can actually reduce stone risk, while cola does not appear to have a significant effect (Curhan et al, Am J of Epidemiology, 1996). See more on kidney stones myths.

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9. Can I prevent another kidney stone?

Yes!, there are many effective ways to help prevent another stone. Basic dietary changes can reduce your chances of forming another stone by half while more involved medical treatment can reduce that even further. While these changes may not guarantee that you will not form another stone, they can make it less likely that you will have to experience another painful stone episode. See our stone prevention center to find out more.

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10. What are my treatment options for my kidney stone?

Treatment options for stones include allowing a stone to pass by itself, using medications to help pass a stone, and surgery to treat or remove a stone. Our stone treatment center has more information, including videos and diagrams of stone surgeries to help you better understand your options.

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11. What are the signs of a kidney stone emergency?

If you think you are passing a stone, signs indicating that you should seek immediate medical attention include:

  • Fever above 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Other symptoms of a urinary tract infection with a stone, including burning during urination, cloudy urine, or bad smelling urine
  • Persistent nausea and vomiting
  • Intolerable pain
  • Certain medical conditions can make passing a stone potentially more dangerous, including those with only one kidney, those with diabetes, or those with decreased kidney function

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12. How long does it take to form a kidney stone?

It appears that stones can form in as short a period of time as three months. This is based on research of soldiers deploying to Kuwait and Iraq where the mean time to development of a symptomatic stone was 93 days in the hot desert environment. (Evans and Costabile, J Urol, 2005)

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13. What is my risk of forming another kidney stone?

In general, the chances of developing another stone is about 40-50% over five years. In other words, 1 out of 2 new stone formers should expect to develop another stone within the next five years. However, there are many effective ways to reduce the chances of recurrence with simple diet changes. See our prevention center for more details.

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14. Am I going to be able to pass my (insert size here) stone?

Your likelihood of passing a stone will primarily depend on its size, its location, and how long you have been trying to pass a stone. We go over this in our infographic available here: What are my chances of successfully passing passing my stone?

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15. What surgery option should I choose?

There are three common surgeries for stones. These include ureteroscopy, shockwave lithotripsy, and percutaneous nephrolithotripsy. We go over the pros and cons of each here: How do I choose which surgery to have for my kidney stones?

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16. What is a ureteral stent?

A stent is a flexible hollow tube placed inside the ureter. It allows urine to drain around a stone and helps the ureter heal after surgery. It is entirely inside your body and is not visible from the outside. Stents can cause you to feel like you have to urinate often, can cause minor bleeding, and can cause pain. Find out more about stents here: All about ureteral stents.

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17. How is a ureteral stent placed?

Ureteral stents are usually placed in the operating room by your doctor. A flexible wire is slid up the ureter and the stent is slid over the wire. The wire is removed and the stent remains. At each end of the stent are natural “curls” to keep it in place until it is removed or exchanged. See more about stent placement here: How is a ureteral stent placed?

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18. How is a stent removed?

Ureteral stents can be removed in two ways. Most commonly, your doctor will remove the stent by placing a camera into your bladder through your urethra (the tube where urine exits your body). The stent is grasped with an instrument and removed. The second method is used when a string is left attached to the stent. The string, which is visible exiting the urethra, is pulled until the stent comes out. See more about stent removal here: How is a ureteral stent removed?

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19. Why do I have pain after my stent was removed?

Some mild amount of discomfort after stent removal is expected. However, in some patients, severe pain may occur for several hours after stent removal. This is thought to be due to spasms of the ureter or swelling and temporary blockage developing after the stent comes out. Not enough is known about this phenomenon but one recent study suggests it may occur in as many as half of patients. In the study, a single dose of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug given 15 minutes before stent removal was highly effective at preventing the severe pain from developing. You can read more about the study here: Severe pain after stent removal: How often does it occur and can anything prevent it?

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226 Responses to Kidney Stones FAQ

  1. kirsten says:

    I had 2 small stones removed from my left kidney, I have stones in my right kidney but never experienced any issues, my left kidney is constant sharp pains, I take a deep breath and its a sharp stabbing pain, I have lost my apitite, lost so much weight, last few days has been nausea and vomiting, fevers, chills and night sweats, i went to a normal gp last week as i had a.fever, constant vomiting (phlem) as i have nothing in my system as i just have NO APITITE @ ALL, i was put on a drip, the nausea went away but im still barely eating and the chills and fever stays,I am out of options as I keep going back to Urologists who tell me the stones are far too small to cause such pain, I dont have blood in the urine, but all the other signs ia making me worried. Should I go see a nephrologist as a 4th opinion as I keep going to different Urologists with the same answers but I feel very strongly there is something wrong that they are picking up, im 24 years old I have 2 small children and how much longer should I.continue to feel like this, im so tired and just want to lay down as I have.no energy and this is not me! I have been mis diagnosed before regarding my cervical and I will not go through that again. I feel doctors dont do their jobs properly!

    • Mel says:

      Find another doctor. Insist on an MRI. Many times you are told you shouldn’t feel something when you actually do. You are not going crazy trust me.

      • Mel says:

        I was told I had the flu when actually I had become septic due to a lodged stone. Thank goodness for nurse practitioners! Also told that stones don’t move around when in later studies this proves to be false. They do move around and cause pain. These stones are not round but spiked in places.

        • Mel says:

          After multiple complaints of pain in my right kidney being dismissed by my neurologist I insisted on an MRI which found renal cell carcinoma….again, a pain that I was told I should not feel.

  2. Shiv kumar says:

    Sir i want to know in how many days a kidney stone is form. size aprox of 16mm

  3. Peggy says:

    Hi..I’m 29 years old..female
    I woke up fine…I’ve gone pee several times already ..cloudy ..off smell.
    Now pain in the left side of my back into the side and radiating into the front.
    I’ve never had stones or a kidney infection. So I don’t know for sure at this point what I’m feeling . It’s more constant with a throb in the center of the pain.

  4. Jeff Baumgardner says:

    I need to thank the doctors an patients alike for all the helpful posts ,it has given me insight an hope for my situation. I’am 44 y/o 6 ‘3″ current half pack a day smoker high blood pressure osteo arthritis in both ankles cellulitus in both legs , diabetic an have Bmi of 54. I have had 3 lithotripsy’s in the past since I started having pain in my primarily in my right kidney the early 1990’s the stones have increased thru out time 5.5 mm to just over 13. mm in my right kidney, I also pasted one stone in left kidney in early 2000 it being 2.2 mm . Now I have a staghorn calculus kidney stone in right kidney that has encompassed 95% of the kidney ,with in the last six months I’ve had stent inserted ,two(2)renal laser cystoscopic lithotripsy, stent removed post surgery . An as of Dec 2015 I still have at least half of calculus stone still in my right kidney . I have at least 3 more surgeries to look forward to. I participate in a kidney stone clinic an Litholinkstone study, my urologist says stone is calcium oxcilate based. I Take preventative meds as potassium citrate (9000mg a / day )which I quit taking I take even one an feel worse from onset ( nausea,pain increases in kidney an just horrible), an allopurinol 300 mg ,25 mg Hctz . I’m in pain ever day from this kidney stone ,I’am getting No satisfaction from my Urologist who says I shouldn’t have any pain at all bless his heart I beg to differ even with 5 mg of oxy I take twice a day doesn’t help once I start to be motivated or work out Pain increases into unmanageable an I’m done ,it’s like I never even took the pain medicine,I can go on an on Its hard to be a productive member of society when I have to deal with the chronic kidney pain that lasts for majority of the day an effects my sleep at night , can’t remember when it was when I had a pain free day. I would appreciate any replies T.Y.

    • Graham says:

      You need to disolve the stones, and flush them out… correct.
      Medical people havent found out what you can take for that yet… (do they wnt too)..??
      So try this;
      1/ Drink 2l of coke and then a tin of asparagus… it will penetrate the stone, then react and break it up. It will hurt as peices will pass, so you may need a pain killer.
      OR
      2/ Drink lots and lots of Cranberry juice, they will break up and flow out.
      I expect you pain tolerance is high, so just relax sit back, and drink lots of water.
      If this doesnt work, you have lost nothing. If it does work you will be happy and do it 2,3,or 4 times a year.. and be a happy soul.
      Call me and let me know,
      Graham +61 427577435

    • Valerie says:

      PLEASE look into a medicinal plant called Phyllanthus Niruri or Green Chanca Piedra. This plant has always been used to break up kidney stones that traditional medications cannot (calcium oxalate/calicum phospate types). Not only will it help with the pain from the stone but it also helps your entire digestive system so NO upset stomach and horrible side effects. All you have to do is drink some tea!! It is HIGHLY effective at treating pain since it inhibits neurotransmitter processes that relay and receive pain signals. Since it behaves also like a alpha blocker it will decrease pain also by relaxing your smooth muscle fibers. Sad to say that people that take pharmaceutical medications to treat kidney stones are LESS likely to pass the stone by miles (around 1.45x’s more likely then placebo which is only 68%). Since this plant has been shown to be 94% effective and is actually widely used in Brazil and prescribed by their doctors. It is also SUPER good a preventing new stones of ALL types and in ALL places buy increasing your urine output of harmful substances AND inhibiting your body from creating calcium oxalate! Of course at the same time this plant kills off any type of infections be it fungal, bacterial, or viral. Decreases your blood pressure, cholestrol, triglyercides, and stops tumor growth. All while having NO and I mean NO side effects to deal with unlike EVERY prescription pill known to mankind! I know what it’s like to be in incredible pain ALL the time till you just want to give up and accept that your pretty much nonfunctional, though my pain comes from different source (my immune system is attacking my sympathetic nervous system leading to insane amounts of pain (nothing is actually more painful then RSD.)) So after seeing tons of doctors and totally exhausting ALL medical options I decided to just see what else is out there and BOY was I surprised! I always thought of medicinal plants as being a watered down version of pharmaceutical medications. That is TOTALLY false! But drug companies CANNOT patent plants so we’ve been fed a lie and told that it’s our ONLY option or at least our BEST option. So instead of taking one plant to help our issues we are prescribed pain killers, muscle relaxers, nausea/peptic medication to deal with having to take drugs that destroy your stomach lining, and for you kidney stone preventative medications. Then we are told that we shouldn’t be in THAT much pain because doctors are worried about having to prescribe pain killers! I’ve heard that too many times! The truth was I was ALWAYS right and it was the doctor that hadn’t really figured out what was going on in my body yet. So if they truly think that there is NO way that it should be super painful and it is get another option!!!! Doctors are NOT miracle workers they are normal people like you and me and they make mistakes. Also doctors have NO training in nutrition, diet, or medicinal plants instead ALL their time is spent trying to keep up will ALL the new medications coming out so don’t expect them to know about ANY medicinal/diet related therapies. I just say ANYTHING is better then where you are right now! You can’t not hope to feel good when your medications are making you sicker due to side effects! You actually can’t even know exactly how much pain your in from the stones if your are nauseous in ANY way since stomach pain will magnify ALL other pains ten fold!!! For me the difference between my conditions pain and my condition plus my stomach is night and day. One I can survive the day and while not feeling great I’m functional and can even be somewhat happy. Then other I’m completely NON functional and feel so awful I can’t even get the energy to take care of myself and feel like crawling into a hole and dying literally unfortunately!!

  5. Jim says:

    I have had 2 epsiodes with Kidney stones. the first was a 8mm stone that they did lithotripsy on. That was in Jan of 2013. Took 4 months to pass the fragments. The pain was horrible. The next one started its journey down the ureters Aug 2015. I felt that horrible excruciating pain. I knew what it was. I started guzzing water trying to speed up the passage to where I induced vomiting and then the pain subsided. Little did I know that the stone was still in me it just moved further down toward the bladder. Sept 2015 I see blood in urine no pain. I go to doctor tells me I have infection and gives antibiotics. 7 days later infection gone so is the blood no pain. Nov 2015 wake up with intense pain groin area. I thought it was the rich pot pie soup I ate the night before. pain gone after 24 hours.(Stone entering the bladder) 6 days later burning sensation in anus area and sharp pain on and off just below the penis. Thought I was developing infection. Kept drinking plenty of water. lasted 2 days. On Sunday Dec 6 at 9:15 after drinking 20 oz of coffee (yea coffee) I had to urinate badly and I gave birth to a 6.3mm stone. I was shocked. Took 4 months of drinking 64 oz of water plus 1 tablespoon of lemmon juice a day to pass that thing. I will be seeing my doctor on Tuesday the 8th and I have a wonderful surprise to show him. I can attest that if you have had 1 you will more then likely get another.This time I am changing my diet and follow instructions. I must admit I got lax after the first one and I paid the price.

  6. Danielle says:

    I have been in constant pain for about 3 years. I have had 14 surgeries in the 3 years that i’ve been going through this, with no luck.
    I’ve had:
    * full abdomiinal hysterectomy
    * 2 x left ovarian
    * 6 ovarian cysts removed
    * 1 ovary removed
    * 1 fallopian tube removed
    * then 1 ovary and fallopian tube removed at the same time
    * Exploratory surgery x 3

    In total i’ve had it, and the only common thing that is left to explore was my kidney stones. I have one left kidney (born with it) and there are 7 non-obstructive kidney stones in that kideny, with the largest measuring 8mm and the smallest 1mm. I have been to renal specialist and i’ve asked to remove them for my own piece of mind and know that if it doesn’t work, i’ve exhausted all options.

    Has anyone else suffered with NON OBSTRUCTING kidney stones? have you been suffering with the following symptoms:

    * Constant nagging aching in my left side (Flank pain to describe the area). I get it right to my groin and it wraps around my back).
    * Frequent urination
    * When I press on the area i am in a LOT of pain
    * Smelly urine
    * Can’t stand still, just have to keep moving the pain is unbearable
    * Been through multiple procdures all with the same result.
    * Feeling really tired Maybe because of the multiple pain relief I am on. Cause I am on a LOT.

  7. Raina says:

    There is no mention of hyperparathyroid disease as a cause of kidney stones, which is what caused mine. If left untreated it will kill a patient within 25 years. I am amazed that so little seems to be known about it. Consider adding information about this condition, it could save some folks years of pain and suffering.
    Thanks!

    • FERDOSUS A MOHAMMAD says:

      RAINA SAHAB, LIKE YOU I AM ALSO SUFFERING FROM THE REDCURRANT RENAL CALCULI. I GOT MINE CRUSHED BY LITHOTRIPSY AT APOLLO HOSPITAL DELHI, SEVEN YEARS AGO. LAST TIME MY STONES WERE 18 MM, 12 MM, BUT HIS TIME THE SIZE HAS GROWN TO 21 MM. WITH GRADE ll, HYDRONEPHRITES . LAST NIGHT AT 11 PM I HAD TO GO TO EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT FOR SEVERE PAIN RELIEF. NO ONE IS TELLING ME WHY THEY FORM AT FIRST PLACE , AS IT HAS STARTED NOW IN OUR EXTENDED FAMILY. MY SON AND MY TWO NEPHEWS ALSO SUFFER STONES. PLEASE SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES AND ADVICE ON MY EMAIL – ferdous6@gmail.com. I strongly believe that parathyroid glands have something to do with it. if you know, please let me know about tests and treatments- preventive as well.

      • Terrie Baker says:

        I started passing kidney stones in 1977 and I was diagnosed with Hypercalcemia in about 1997 caused by Hyper Parathyroidism.
        In 2002 all 4 parathyroid were removed and the only problem I will continue to develop kidney stones.
        Best of luck

  8. Ricardo says:

    I have sharp pains jolt through my kidney… … down into my pelvis, and sometimes feels as though it is originating in my lower pelvic region.

  9. Ricardo says:

    I’ve been having regular x-rays to monitor a kidney stone in my left kidney.

  10. jessie says:

    hello :)
    i am 15 years old.previously some 2 or 3 years ago,i used to experience frequent urination urgency but my teachers are so well that they doesn’t used to send me to the washrooms.Fed up with that,i had been to a diabetologist to check whether the cause behind this is diabetes or not.Thanks to the doctor i didn’t have that.She asked me some questions and i answered them all and finally she gave a report that i were having URINAL INFECTION.That was something which sounded so bad.But now,Recently a month ago,i experienced very severe pain in the lower abdomen(right side) and nearly after a week of torture(due to pain),i finally went to the doctor and came back with good but bitter medicines to dissolve my 5.8mm kidney stone.I have been facing nausea since i were 10 years(i dont know when my kidney stone started).I had blood in my urine,nausea,lower abdominal pain etc.And recently,i got good reports and my kidney stone’s episode is over now.But after 15 days of this good report,i am having pain in hips(actually back) on both sides and i am again facing nausea.what does this mean?please suggest me.

    • jessie says:

      i am again having nausea,frequent urination and more more new thing added that is back pain.my mom,my teachers are not letting me to take rest..i been to college to overcome this torture but ended up with my own loss..please help me. :)

  11. Michelle says:

    Okay so I have kidney stones that are still in my kidney but I’m having extreme pain in my kidneys and my bladder has anybody else experienced this and can you tell me why they hurt when the things moving?

    • Bunny says:

      I just ended up in the ER last night for severe pain in both kidneys. A CAT scan showed no stones in my ureter, only 2 smaller stones in my left kidney and 1 in my right. Kidney functions are normal. The ER doc insists there is no way my pain could be from my stones and thinks it is muscular issues. But bc I have had stones in the past I know what kidney pain feels like and this is definitely the same pain. My thought is maybe I am more sensitive than most and can feel them in the kidney, but I won’t know for sure until I see my urologist again in the next week or so. I’ll keep you posted! For reference it literally feels like I got kicked in the back on both sides between my middle and lower back area towards the outside.

  12. Dawn says:

    On July 3rd I went to the emergency room. I had been in pain for 3 days. I knew it was a kidney stone as I had them a few times already. Once I got there, everything got crazy. Taking blood, etc. Turns out I had became sepsis and was in really bad shape. Within an hour I was wheeled to the OR to have a Stent put in. I was fully aware of the procedure as I was only given fentenal. After spending 3 days in the hospital I was released. I have surgery for July 22nd to remove the big stone on my right side. I have some smaller ones on the left side that the doc will keep an eye on.
    This Stent has given me nothing but trouble. The tube keeps catching on everything. Last night it got wrapped up in the cabinet pull and when I stepped back it yanked. It took my breath away. I am over this Stent but was told I would more than likely have it for 2 weeks after surgery, so a total of 4 week.
    If you do suspect you have a stone, go to your doc or ER. You could turn sepsis. Also pain pills make passing them a lot easier. I was in really bad shape. On the plus side, all the pain made me unable to eat and I lost 17 lbs.

  13. sai bhavana says:

    i have a very small stone in my kidney,when it was formed i was suffered from fever,right now i am using homeopathy medicine,but i did not get my period this month,can you please tell me the cause for this

  14. Ashton says:

    I pasted my first kidney stone like three weeks ago and I felt a lot better but for the past four days I’m having side,pains again. I would say the pain is abt a 3 or 4 but my urine is a little yellow . Is it possible to have another kidney stone so fast ?

    • Dawn says:

      I’ve had the same pains. My doc told me it was due to the stress my kidneys were under. You may want to go get a checkup just encase.

  15. Rebecca F says:

    If I have a uric acid kidney stone, do I have to moderate my oxalate consumption?

  16. sam says:

    I have a friend who had a surgery of bladder for removing of 15mm stone 10 months ago and now he was having blood in urine so he went hospital for video x-ray and found that 15mm stone in his left kidney. So i m concern that is it possible to appear 15mm of stone within that short period of time?

  17. Caroline says:

    So I am a 19 year old female and I have never had a kidney stone before. My older sister has a few times but not anyone else in my family. About 4 days ago I began to have some symptoms of a uti but they weren’t anywhere near severe. Just annoying. For the last four days, I have been drinking lots of water and urinating whenever possible. Today I felt the urge to urinate again so I went to the bathroom, pulled down my pants, and there was a very small crystally looking rock. I googled extensively and found that it looks most like the uric acid stone. I had no kidney pain, barely any uti symptoms, and then all of a sudden, there it was. I’m not too sure what to do now. Was it even a kidney stone? Was it caused by the uti or did it cause the uti symptoms? I am so confused…. Any advice is welcome. Thanks.

    • Bunny says:

      Definitely sounds you passed a stone. I would take it to the doc to have it tested and also get a imaging to see if there are any more in your kidneys. Good luck! Drink tons of water, add lemon when possible and limit your consumption of oxolate foods / supplements etc.

  18. Jessica mills says:

    I have one kidney and having pains and passing stones should I go to the er

  19. Jessica mills says:

    I have only one kidney an passing stones an I’m in pain should I go to the er I had it for 3 day.

  20. Celine says:

    Is it okay to work out/run while having a kidney stone?

    • Trish says:

      If you can tolerate it. Kidney stones do not have to disrupt your quality of day to day life, but if you experience pain or discomfort you will have to modify your activities and seek treatment.

  21. Parveen kumar says:

    i have stone 9.00 mm in lower part of ureter.
    No pain
    But can i do…..?
    Regard

  22. juoma says:

    i had kidney stone when i was 13..i dont actually feel the pain..but mostime i do when i take sugary thing…but for 3days now i av been taking lot of water..now i feel pain on the right side of my kidney and on my leg…does it mean im passing the stone

  23. andile says:

    I have low back pain and around my pubic area does that mean I have kidney stones or kidney failure?anyone help me please I’m dying.

    • Skyler says:

      It could be a kidney stone I have had two and if your having really bad pains where you cant sit down or can’t stop moving then you should go get checked out or if you feel like your going to get sick thats how i feel and I had one when I was 13 and 3 year later I found out I had another one like 2 days ago worst pain of my life

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