Kidney Stones FAQ

1. What is a kidney stone?

2. Do I have a kidney stone?

3. What are the symptoms of a kidney stone?

4. Do all kidney stones cause pain?

5. What causes a kidney stone?

6. Can I take something to dissolve my kidney stone?

7. How do kidney stones form?

8. Was it something I ate/drank?

9. Can I prevent another kidney stone?

10. What are the treatment options for my kidney stone?

11. What are the signs of a kidney stone emergency?

12. How long does it take to form a kidney stone?

13. What is my risk of forming another kidney stone?

14. Am I going to be able to pass my (insert size here) stone?

15. Which surgery should I choose?

16. What is a ureteral stent?

17. How is a stent placed?

18. How is a stent removed?

19. Why do I have pain after my stent was removed?

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1. What is a kidney stone?

Kidney stones are the formation of crystalline structures in the urinary tract (which includes the kidneys, ureters, and bladder). These stones can cause pain, infection, and kidney damage. Stones can be small, from 1 mm to very large, filling up an entire kidney. For pictures of stones, see our stone gallery.

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2. Do I have a kidney stone?

For patients experiencing their first stone episode, the pain can be so severe and sudden that it stops them in their tracks. Without prior knowledge of what a stone episode feels like, it can be confusing and frightening to go through this amount of discomfort, which is usually described as the worst pain someone has ever experienced. A trip to the emergency room is usually required to make the diagnosis and provide treatment for an active kidney stone. X-rays, usually a CT scan, can be used to confirm that a stone is present.

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3. What are the symptoms of passing a kidney stone?

Stone pain is often described as stabbing and extremely severe. Women commonly say that it is worst than having a child. The pain can start in the upper back (flank) and then migrate to the abdomen and groin. Changing positions does not help relieve the pain. The pain of a kidney stone is primarily due to blockage of the urine drainage coming down the small tube called the “ureter” that connects a kidney to the bladder. See a diagram of the urinary system.

It is thought that the increased pressure stretches the kidney and ureter, causing the pain. This is why stone pain can come and go in waves, as the drainage tube is periodically blocked by the stone trying to make its way out. As the stone moves further down the tube, the pain experienced moves down the body. Other symptoms common during a stone episode include seeing blood in the urine, nausea & vomiting, and feeling the urge to urinate. Once a stone is passed and makes it way out of the ureter tube and into the bladder, most patients describe a sensation of instant relief as the blockage and pressure is relieved. However, stones can take from days to weeks to pass. See a diagram of locations where stones typically get obstructed.

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4. Do all kidney stones cause pain?

Most doctors feel that kidney stones only cause pain if they are blocking the ureter and trying to pass down towards the bladder. Stones that are not obstructing, such as those located in the kidney’s calyxes, are generally thought to be non-painful. This explains why some patients can have extremely large stones filling up their entire kidney with no or minimal pain.

However, it does appear that some non-obstructing stones can cause pain because of either blockage of small tubular structures in the kidney itself (the collecting tubules) or for other unclear reasons. Supporting this view is a recent medical journal article suggesting that the treatment of small non-obstructing “papillary” stones may provide pain relief. (Gdor et al, Multi-institutional assessment of ureteroscopic laser papillotomy for chronic pain associated with papillary calcifications, J Urol 2011) Additionally, testimonials from many kidney stone patients (including a urologist with a personal history of kidney stones) suggest that some  non-obstructing stones can cause pain.

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5. What causes a kidney stone?

Kidney stones affect 1 out of 10 people during their lifetimes. They are more common than most people realize. There are many factors that determines whether someone will develop a stone with some being under a person’s control while others are out of their hands.

Common factors influencing kidney stone development:

  • Gender: Men are two to three times more likely to form stones
  • Race: Caucasians have the highest stone rates as compared to other races
  • Age: Stones occur most commonly between the 20s to 50s
  • Geography: Those living in hot dry environments are at increased risk. Additionally, those living in the Southeastern United States appear to be at particularly increased risk of forming stones.
  • Seasonal climate: Stone development is more common during the summer months due to dehydration from higher summertime temperatures and possibly also from higher concentrations of calcium in urine resulting from increased sun exposure which can lead to higher levels of Vit D production.
  • Occupation: Those working in jobs with exposure to climate and dehydration are more prone to stone development.
  • Body weight: There are higher rates of stones in those with increased weight and body mass index.
  • Genetics and medical conditions: Individuals with a history of some conditions, such as medullary sponge kidney or renal tubular acidosis are prone to forming stones. Those with a personal family history of stones may have two to three times increased risk of forming stones.
  • Infections: Chronic urinary tract infections can lead to the development of infection related stones, known as struvite stones.

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6. Can I take something to dissolve my kidney stone?

Patients often ask whether something can be taken to dissolve their stones. Unfortunately, the most common stone types (calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate, accounting for 80% of all stones) cannot be dissolved with medications.

However, in patients with uric acid stones, which account for 5-7% of stones, medication (potassium citrate) can be successfully given to dissolve the stones, helping them to pass and preventing them from re-developing.

Patients with the less common cystine type stones (1-3% of stone formers) can also benefit from potassium citrate and water intake to help dissolve their stones. Cystine stone formers additionally can be treated with D-penicillamine or α-mercaptopropionylglycine to help bind and dissolve their stones.

Finally, patients with struvite, or “infection”, stones were in the past more commonly treated with hemiacidrin irrigation solution which is dripped directly onto stones through a tube placed directly into the kidney. However, because of potentially serious side effects from this medication and the difficulty in giving it, this type of therapy is now uncommon.

Learn more about different types of stones.

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7. How do kidney stones form?

There are many factors that lead to the development of kidney stones. For details and a visual time-line of the steps in stone formation, see: How do stones form?

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8. Was it something I ate/drank?

In most patients, we find diet is not the main reason that caused a stone to form in the first place. Other important factors also play a role in determining whether someone is “prone” to forming stones. In other words, a non-stone-former can eat the exact same diet as a stone-former and never get stones.

That said, diet can play an important role in the prevention of future stones. The three most important dietary factors for most stone formers to modify in reducing their risk of future stones are to increase total fluid intake, decrease sodium intake, and and decrease protein (meat) intake.

Some commonly held beliefs of  foods that promote stones including cola, tea, coffee, and calcium intake have not been shown to be true. In fact, research suggests that increasing tea, coffee, and calcium intake can actually reduce stone risk, while cola does not appear to have a significant effect (Curhan et al, Am J of Epidemiology, 1996). See more on kidney stones myths.

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9. Can I prevent another kidney stone?

Yes!, there are many effective ways to help prevent another stone. Basic dietary changes can reduce your chances of forming another stone by half while more involved medical treatment can reduce that even further. While these changes may not guarantee that you will not form another stone, they can make it less likely that you will have to experience another painful stone episode. See our stone prevention center to find out more.

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10. What are my treatment options for my kidney stone?

Treatment options for stones include allowing a stone to pass by itself, using medications to help pass a stone, and surgery to treat or remove a stone. Our stone treatment center has more information, including videos and diagrams of stone surgeries to help you better understand your options.

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11. What are the signs of a kidney stone emergency?

If you think you are passing a stone, signs indicating that you should seek immediate medical attention include:

  • Fever above 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Other symptoms of a urinary tract infection with a stone, including burning during urination, cloudy urine, or bad smelling urine
  • Persistent nausea and vomiting
  • Intolerable pain
  • Certain medical conditions can make passing a stone potentially more dangerous, including those with only one kidney, those with diabetes, or those with decreased kidney function

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12. How long does it take to form a kidney stone?

It appears that stones can form in as short a period of time as three months. This is based on research of soldiers deploying to Kuwait and Iraq where the mean time to development of a symptomatic stone was 93 days in the hot desert environment. (Evans and Costabile, J Urol, 2005)

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13. What is my risk of forming another kidney stone?

In general, the chances of developing another stone is about 40-50% over five years. In other words, 1 out of 2 new stone formers should expect to develop another stone within the next five years. However, there are many effective ways to reduce the chances of recurrence with simple diet changes. See our prevention center for more details.

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14. Am I going to be able to pass my (insert size here) stone?

Your likelihood of passing a stone will primarily depend on its size, its location, and how long you have been trying to pass a stone. We go over this in our infographic available here: What are my chances of successfully passing passing my stone?

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15. What surgery option should I choose?

There are three common surgeries for stones. These include ureteroscopy, shockwave lithotripsy, and percutaneous nephrolithotripsy. We go over the pros and cons of each here: How do I choose which surgery to have for my kidney stones?

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16. What is a ureteral stent?

A stent is a flexible hollow tube placed inside the ureter. It allows urine to drain around a stone and helps the ureter heal after surgery. It is entirely inside your body and is not visible from the outside. Stents can cause you to feel like you have to urinate often, can cause minor bleeding, and can cause pain. Find out more about stents here: All about ureteral stents.

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17. How is a ureteral stent placed?

Ureteral stents are usually placed in the operating room by your doctor. A flexible wire is slid up the ureter and the stent is slid over the wire. The wire is removed and the stent remains. At each end of the stent are natural “curls” to keep it in place until it is removed or exchanged. See more about stent placement here: How is a ureteral stent placed?

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18. How is a stent removed?

Ureteral stents can be removed in two ways. Most commonly, your doctor will remove the stent by placing a camera into your bladder through your urethra (the tube where urine exits your body). The stent is grasped with an instrument and removed. The second method is used when a string is left attached to the stent. The string, which is visible exiting the urethra, is pulled until the stent comes out. See more about stent removal here: How is a ureteral stent removed?

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19. Why do I have pain after my stent was removed?

Some mild amount of discomfort after stent removal is expected. However, in some patients, severe pain may occur for several hours after stent removal. This is thought to be due to spasms of the ureter or swelling and temporary blockage developing after the stent comes out. Not enough is known about this phenomenon but one recent study suggests it may occur in as many as half of patients. In the study, a single dose of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug given 15 minutes before stent removal was highly effective at preventing the severe pain from developing. You can read more about the study here: Severe pain after stent removal: How often does it occur and can anything prevent it?

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178 Responses to Kidney Stones FAQ

  1. Rajesh Kumar says:

    I have 13 mm stone in upper calyx of right kidney but no pain. plz give me suggestions how it will be removed . I don’t need operation. .Is there any procedures or any medicine to melt that stone? I have diabetes also.

    • beacon debbarma says:

      Sir, contact ur nearest urologist.. I think ur stone is little large u may need ureteroscopy.. As u say that u have diabetes.. Dnt underestimate the stone.. Kidney stone dnt cause pain. They damage the kidney without any symptom.. I also undergo surgey in this month

  2. Betty says:

    Yep…I had a stent for two miserable, agonized weeks before begging for it to be taken out. I used enough pain meds to kill a horse, but the pain didn’t stop. At the time, I would not have cared if I overdosed, just shoot me. Now I drink nothing but lemonade and the small stones I pass are simply annoying. I highly recommend lemonade to help dissolve the stones.

    • Tony says:

      I have been drinking lemonade by the gallon! I have had a stent in now for two weeks and I am sick of not sleeping through the night. I get up every two hours for a burning urine session in the bathroom. I am supposed to have it removed in two days and the stone is “to be removed by any means necessary”. I cannot wait for my life to get back to normal.

      I have become quite the lemonade connoisseur. I prefer “Simply Lemonade” the best. It has the best taste and contains the most citric acid. “Minute Maid” tastes like it is mostly sugar.

  3. tashi Dema says:

    i have kidney stones, and it has been almost 6 months, my stone size ranges from 3, 4mmx7mm, there is no signs of having it..whats my problem?

    • Anthony G says:

      Have you tried rapaflo? That stuff helped me pass two 7 mm stones already. Ready for my last one..

    • beacon debbarma says:

      Dear tashi most kidney stone dnt cause any pain or symptoms.. They hamper kidney without symptoms. Unless they move which cause pain.. Rush to your nearest neurologist.. Otherwise it will damage kidney.. I had surgery a week ago..

  4. Anthony G says:

    Hi there. I’m 25, somewhat active (but not in my best physical shape) and I try and eat healthy when I can. I had a kidney stone attack a few weeks ago (this being my second episode in a year) and had searing pain, bleeding and vomiting. I went to the ER and had an IV put in for pain and fluids . At the same time I had my blood and urine tested and a uretal ultrasound. They found nothing in the kidney that I was having pain in so they assumed I passed that one. However they found an 8mm stone in my left kidney. Their concern was that I had an elevated white blood cell count and a an elevated creatinine level. I went to a urologist a few days later to evaluate my situation and he just suggested more imaging in a couple weeks and drinking plenty of fluids. So I did, and I was really reluctant on going back to any doctor. I haven’t seen any doctor or gotten any imaging done and I actually passed the 8mm stone a week ago. I haven’t had any bleeding or unusual urine color, but I’ve been having mild back discomfort and this newly developed bone pain in my ribs. Could all of these symptoms be due to a large stone like that passing, or is it uncommon to feel like this? I would also like to mention that I just haven’t been feeling well (tired, unmotivated and sometimes depressed) I’ve read that some patients experience discomfort for up to several weeks after passing a stone, but I’m concerned about how down and tired I’ve been feeling. Thanks for any info!

    • beacon debbarma says:

      Dear anthony exactly the same situation i am passing.. & later i came to know that i have hydronephrosis Which caused due to kidney stone.. It cause backpain & urge to urinate.. Contat ur urologist.. He will prescribed medication.

  5. Alice Walker says:

    Kidney stones are very painful. I was advised that fresh coconut juice and cranberry juice can help as relief for this health problem. This post is very in-depth and informative. Thanks for sharing this.

  6. Attleheide says:

    I have Advanced Polycystic Kidney Disease, & it was discovered 3 & 1/2 yr.s ago, “incidently”, upon my 5-month pregancy sonogram-this Iis a genetically-inherited idease that does not “skip” generations in families, however-I am the 1st person on both my maternal & paternal side that has been ill & been diagnosed with advanced chronic kidney disease. My 68-yr.-old father has just recently (3 mo.s ago) started having medical manifestations/symptoms, & has now been diagnosed with the same. My Palliative Care Caseworker was the person that introduced me to the additonal complications that Chronic Kidney Disease presents to patients, but I have never felt a stone move/pass. I went to the lab for my bi-annual urine test & bloodwork, In order to present to my Nephrologist & Urologist next week. My middle R. Ureter started feeling raw/scraped/cut 4 days ago-right after leaving the lab. The pain has moved to the kower R side, & since it was “detectable” (to me) 4 days ago, has also incited a feeling of urgency on the R side of my bladder & r. urethra. I “Googled” this site on my mobile, &it has been extremely helpful & educational! (I haven’t had much nausea-besides what nausea Stage 3 Renal Failure produces-& I haven’t vomited; so I haven’t taken atime to report this new “development/complication” to any of my doctors. The urgency to urinate is annoying, so when I see my specialists, next week, I will advise them. I am grateful to have this website to refer to, as I anticipate I am trying to pass a small stone, & your website has provided me with the emergency “signs” I need to watch for (high temp./vomiting, etc.), as well as how long it is expected to take to pass a small stone. Thank you-thank you!

  7. Meg says:

    I had to take my mom to the ER last night because of severe pain in her back due to a 6mm stone. The doctor gave her pain meds and sent her back home to call another doctor today and make an appointment. My question is – can waiting for this stone to pass or waiting for surgery make this situation worse? I would think if the stone is stuck it would cause infection so I don’t understand why it’s taking so long for the doctors to get this taken care of.

    • kelly says:

      Meg,
      It depends on where the stone is located as to whether or not it’s considered emergent. If the stone is causing a blockage, it can be serious. I have had kidney stones for 20 years now. I got my first one at 18. I get them at least yearly and in the past few years, i get them in clusters in both kidneys. The past 2 CT scans I have had have shown 15-20 stones throughout both kidneys. My last CT showed a 10mm stone in my left kidney and it was causing a blockage so I had surgery the day after my scan. I had a lithotripsy and stent placed last week and just had the stent removed. Your mother should definitely see a Urologist as soon as possible. I am also an ICU nurse and have seen some scary things happen to otherwise healthy patients who have kidney stones that caused life-threatening injuries to patients who go without treatment. Good luck!

    • beacon debbarma says:

      If the stone is small generally it would take a month to pass after a pain.. But yes if she dnt feel pain during urinate .. If there is blood in urine or there she feel discomfort to urinate then she need an emergency operation..

  8. Steph W says:

    You know what I think is garbage? When the doctor looks at you and says “It shouldn’t be causing you pain.” I don’t care how big your stone is, it’s going to hurt when you stat giving birth to it! oh you have a 2mm stone, it will come out on it’s own with no pain. Bite me. Right now I have one 5mm stone coming down the right side since May, you usually have to wait for the stone to cause problems, or to be stuck for four months before the doctor will do anything. I was in an isolated community and unfortunately they couldn’t help. So they sent me home on the hospital plane. When I got home I went straight to the emergency department and then I was treated like a drug addict! they asked me what I had taken for the pain. At that point I had taken Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Gravol,Toradol, Buscopan,Flomax and Atasol 30′s. (here I must tell you that I was addicted to morphine to four years because of a horrible doctor so I am very nervous about taking it after four years of sobriety) The doctor asked me what has worked for me in the past. I hate to compare passing a kidney stone to having a baby, but holy muck, the cramps, my blood pressure dropping, lack of fluids,oxygen needed and also pain killers…here is where the similarity’s end when you have a baby at the end of all that you have this little person, when a person passes a kidney stone, it’s not that cute or cuddly.So back to the Dr. asking me about the pain killers, when I said morphine she looked at the nurse and excused herself. She came back in and said “Well I can’t give you morphine,so here is some Toradol” I looked her straight in the eye and said “That won’t work, I need morphine, this is and emergency, I didn’t come here because I wanted to hang out, I came here to get help for the f-ing pain that I am in!!” (when you are in pain anything can come out of your mouth) So after that yelling session they hooked me up to oxygen and to an IV to get fluids and pain medicine, I thought my body was splitting in two. I started screaming for them to ill me and then they tranq-ed me so I don’t remember much until the next evening. the sonogram that they did on me while I was out and the stone was stuck half way down. The doctor said I could try again but I was so physically and emotionally exhausted I had to let it go for the moment. So tomorrow I am going back to the Dr. and I am hoping that my referral for the urologist has finally gone through, I can’t handle another round of the Dr.s and nurses here trying to force a birth on me again, I will update when I know more. BTW I have been making my stones for the past ten years.

  9. Carrie says:

    O M G. A STENT?! It’s pure hell. I’m a pro at stones. My first one had me throwing up with pain, but shock wave lithotripsy nailed it. Subsequent stones never got as bad because I nipped them at first sign. This one didn’t respond to the shock waves to they went in and nailed it. But this stent is worse than ANY stone I’ve had. I was in post op for HOURS because of pain. I was in hysterics with tears…throwing up (not the anesthesia because that’s always been fine). The pumped me with a med stronger than morphine (starts with a d) and even Valium. Both were short lived and eventually, I was discharged, puking all the way to the car. Needless to say, at home, things are still the same. I’m bedridden and EVERYTIME I move, I feel the POS stent moving with me. Narco doesn’t work. The anti spasm nws (also starts w/ d) isn’t working. Called in a med that starts w/ P (turns urine color, but I puked that up after 30 minutes. They think they are going to keep me doing this for SEVEN DAYS? I have minimal blood but it’s like razor blades coming out. I think Id MUCH rather have my back sliced open then this. I’m dead serious. In everything I’ve read, it’s described as “discomfort”. SERIOUSLY?! I’d rather have an epidural stuck in my back a few thousand times. Chewing an arm off sounds better than this. Am I exaggerating? Nope. For me, this is the worst thing I’ve had to do yet…(even my fall bladder being yanked was easier than this)

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  11. Jen says:

    I’m hoping for some advice. 2 years back, I was in the ER for what I later found out was kidney stones. The doctors told me that they were very small and would likely pass through without any more pain. Within 24 hours the pain stopped completely. That was the end of it.

    As of 3 weeks ago, I’ve had similar but much more mild pains in my pelvic and back region near the same kidney. The pain comes in waves and is usually a deep ache or cramping. It has been intensifying and causing me to lose sleep and vomit. Blood was detected in my urine and an X-ray showed a 3mm calcification. I finally saw a urologist who determined that one stone has been present for at least 2 years now. He claims my pain could not possibly be from the stone because it’s not yet making it’s way down. He chalked it up to muscle spasms and left abruptly.

    Is it possible to feel pain when the stone has not yet dropped down? I recognize this pain as the same from my prior stones and can’t imagine a muscle spasm coincidentally being in the same spot.

  12. Wendy says:

    I had a 15mm stone removed 7 years ago. It was done as an emergency procedure with a stent inserted and lithrotripsy all at the same time. Two weeks later the stent was removed and I subsequently followed fluid and dietary guidelines as well as taking Potassium Citrate for the next six years.

    This past Monday morning I was admitted through the emergency room of a different hospital with another 15mm stone. I had flank pain, very bloody urine, nausea, malaise, etc. Tuesday afternoon, I had a cystoscopy and a stent insertion and was sent home without lithotripsy and the large stone still intact. I was told to call and set up an appointment with the Urology Department for my lithotripsy. I finally got in touch with them (after 3 attempts) today and was told I would have to wait till after Labor Day, unless there was a cancellation. No booking was made. Needless to say I’m upset. I’m a 61 year old female with Lupus and other autoimmune disorders. Does anyone know if it’s safe to wait such a long time? Any feedback would be appreciated.

  13. masoud kowsar says:

    It is now an established fact and effective pleasant way to get rid of kidney or bladder stones. If you take water melon and couple of spoonful of oxymol syrup ( vinegar, sugar, and mint leaves boiled in to a thick syrup), two or three times a week ( more the better) the nasty stones will disappear or get smaller and flushed out . It is a miracle, believe me.

    • Tony Tomlinson says:

      To: Masoud Kowsar

      I just left the ER and I have a 5mm kidney stone. I have googled both oxymol and oxymel syrup but I can’t find a place that sells it online.

      Can you point me to a source that will sell and ship to Texas? If not, can you provide the ratios for the vinegar, sugar and mint leaves?

      Thank you so much! You can PM me at tonytjma@gmail.com

    • Jeremy Jones says:

      This is BS, by the way. Don’t waste your time and money. Only one type of stone can be dissolved (uric acid type) and that requires medication.

  14. I am 22 weeks pregnant and having kidney stones.i have 13mm kidney stone in my right kidney and have a very acute pain.blood in urine and also fever due to high infection.i was admitted in the hospital and was given painkillers such as drotin injection and drip.the pain is unbearable and still it continues.please tell me if I could have any treatment or medication in this case.

    • Tammy says:

      I had a kidney stone too while I was about 4-5 months pregnant. It happened while we were out of town on a holiday weekend. I had a history of stones but this one started passing and I became extremely ill — vomiting non-stop for hours and unbearable pain. So I ended up at the ER and they gave me an epidural block and did a ureteroscopy and with the basket device pulled out two stones which were rather large. I had some pain afterwards but felt much better. My concern is that your stone will become stuck as mine did and doctors get very nervous about surgery when you are pregnant. However, if it does become stuck (which will happen most likely since your stone is large) you will need to have it removed because of risk of infection, vomiting, etc.

  15. Michelle says:

    Hey! This website is great.
    I did a herbal tea detox to kick the stagnant salts out of my liver to clear up my skin and ten days later was taken to the ER with severe pain. It’s a kidney stone. It’s 5mm in diameter.
    Then for five or six days there was no pain really. Just slightly when using the bathroom and an occasional twinge. I went to see a urologist. I have several pills to take 3 times a day now. Today the pain returned to a lesser extent than before. It’s 7 days since initially visiting hospital.
    A lot of the information online that I’ve read relates to men. How is a woman’s body ever going to pass a 5mm stone? The pain now is in my kidney itself after consuming water and in the pubic area when using the bathroom. Have any women ever experienced a kidney stone like this?
    Thanks.

  16. carolyn dearen says:

    have been to a clinic with severe pain and uti symptoms. was given antiobotics, but it didn’t stop the back pain, which presents itsself in the flank area with extreme pain. sharp shooting pains in low abdomen area and down into the groin. severe headaches as well. i ended going to er, where they did a ct scan. no stones found, but still had infection in bladder or kidneys. another four weeks have gone by,mstill with severe pain, nausea, headache and dizziness. still having to get upat least 7-8 times a night to urinate. could i still be suffering from kidney stones w/out showing up on ct scan? i’m reallynsick and getting weaker every day. i am 71 yrs old with other health issues, but this is the worse pain i have ever had. would appreciate a reply.

    • tiffany says:

      Hi Carolyn, I went to the ER 5 weeks ago with pain from a kidney stone. They are hereditary jn my family, was in the hospital for two weeks last year with stones the size of a gumball. When I went 5 weeks ago the stone did not show up on the ct scan. 3 weeks later I went to my primary care who sent me to do another ct scan and this time they showed up. This has happened to me 3 times where they did not show up. You know your body, listen it and insist they do another exam. God bless

  17. carolyn dearen says:

    in last two months, i have gone to the clinic with pain in back below the kidney down my flank and sharp pain in groin area. given antiobotics, but no relief. ended up in the er and had a ct scan, which didn’t showbkidney stones, only another infection. was given new antiobotic. 4 days later i an still in extreme pain and having ti get up a least 7 time ssto

  18. alan says:

    first stone, 32 years ago, had me incoherent on the floor with nausea and pain, passed within a month without assistance.

    Second through lost count stones (every 3-5 yrs for 30 yrs), I recognized the pain building and went to ER, received CT, pain meds, strainer, and within 3-4 weeks, about when I started thinking it must have come out already, it would pop out painlessly.

    All those stones were 3.5 mm to 4x7mm, were very painful for 1-3 days, then a few stabs during the next week, then no pain for the week or two before the stone appeared in the strainer.

    A year ago, at age 61, I decided to do the “Couch To 5k” running program and can now run continuously for 35-40 minutes at a slow jog. Shortly after starting the running program my last “large” stone came out, and since then, three small 1 mm stones have come out with a shorter pain/no pain 2 week profile.

    I am convinced the running helps to clear the stones before they can grow to be “large” stones, and while I have always pushed water, especially during exercise, it does seem that I formed new stones faster this year also, but my diet changed drastically this year as well. I’ll gladly take more frequent smaller stones over the prior “killers” I was producing.

    BTW, my stones are calcium oxalate, idiopathic, and I don’t think daily cranberry juice, colas, or chocolate chip ice cream consumption, or abstinence had any influence on my stone size or frequency. I went on the juice and off cola and ice cream for 10 years with no effect, then added colas, brownies, and chic chip ice cream back with no effect.

    Wishing all “stoners” peace,

    Alan

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