How happy are you with the treatment you had for your stone? – A KidneyStoners survey.

Diagram of laser lithotripsy

Diagram of laser lithotripsy

Last month, we introduced a poll on stent pain and a survey on stent removal. We’ve had a great response so far, with over 500 responses to the poll and over 300 responses to the survey. You can see the results of our survey here.

By answering these surveys and polls, you are contributing to the community of kidney stone patients by letting others know what it is really like to go through the various trials and procedures that are often unfortunately a part of treatment for a kidney stone.

Our next survey is focused on different treatment options for kidney stones, which includes everything from letting the stone pass on its own, taking a home remedy, or different surgical options (shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, or percutaneous surgery).

We want to know why patients choose one option over another. We also are interested in what patients feel after having undergone a treatment- what did you like most about the treatment?what did you like least?; and would you choose this option again?

Please take few minutes and complete the survey below. It’s anonymous and we’ll share the results on this website once we get enough responses.

[EDITOR’S NOTE 3/13/14: Our previous survey on treatment options for kidney stones has been closed. You can see the results here. Please keep an eye out for active surveys available on other pages of this site.]

 

About Dr. Roger Low

Dr. Low is a Professor of Urology at the University of California, Davis. His clinical practice and expertise are in treating patients with urolithiasis. His treatment philosophy is providing patients information to facilitate their choosing treatments that best suit their needs and counseling patients on preventing future stone events. His research interests center on factors contributing to stone formation and development of innovative techniques to treat patients with kidney stones. He is the Residency Training Program Director in charge of training future urologists at the University of California, Davis.
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15 Responses to How happy are you with the treatment you had for your stone? – A KidneyStoners survey.

  1. Leonardo Gracia Arellano says:

    I am so thankful for the urologists who treated me in a right way and most professionally. I had my laser operation last October 2017 on my 4mm kidney stone. I’m so bless for despite of my insurance lowest standard level of policy which is only the class “D”, but still they scheduled me and managed of doing the operation right away. At first I was afraid of allowing this for I am a member of the runner’s club of the present company I have, I assumed I couldn’t run anymore for more. But as they advised, the remaining stone should be removed through the laser operation. The size of the stone before was maintained up to 8mm and after 2 months of taking medicine, it lowered down to 4mm. At first painful attacked which was I think 2015, the ultrasound result, showed that not only I had a kidney stone but also had a prostate enlargement, then he gave me 2 kinds of medicine.
    The second painful attacked was within this year month of August. The ultrasound and CT scan results, again I have a prostate enlargement. After the laser operation, my medicine still going on, for the enlargement but not in kidney stone.
    Now my question for Dr. Roger Low are:
    1) Is there any possibility that the kidney stone will be back and form again, if so what’s the reason?
    2) Why it is that the prostate also enlarged the same time with the kidney stone’s painful attack?
    3) How these will be avoided and what are the remedies and the best treatment for these?
    4) My last check up for prostate was first week of this month. After the blood laboratory result. And the medical procedure was, the Dr.’s finger inserted deeply to my anus. Is there’s any relation to the enlargement of prostate? Or he discovered another one being serious for another urgent treatment, and he advised me that after one month of taking the medicine, I’ll go him back again.

  2. Is a stent necessary during shock wave procedure?

  3. P Webb says:

    It was more painful this time since the last.I had to get 2 ESWL ‘s done this time,within 2 weeks and I’ve never had 2 for one stone.The doc did say they slowed down the procedure on the 2ND one so I think that’s the trick and I’m going back to Dr.Peck .He truly a #1 urologist in my book .

  4. Diane says:

    Some advice for leaking out of your back after having a nephrostomy tube removed: have the nurse stick on an ostomy bag. They’re small, drain easily, the stickiness and pressure help close the hole and, best of all, you don’t have to leak onto towels for 2 days! I had 2 PCNLs (going to need another eventually), lithotripsy, and two nephro bags. I leak soooooo much from the hole in my back. If you’re having this problem, try the sticky ostomy bag. It saved my sanity.

  5. Stephanie says:

    Just had stents removed from both kidneys this afternoon, which were inserted 6 days ago during kidney stone-removal surgery. I am VERY happy to be stone and stent free. The stent hurt a lot the first 4 days, and moderately the last 2. Stent removal hurt a bit but I am a pain warrior by now. Wishing all the readers here a stone free future!

    • Stephanie says:

      PS: Regarding satisfaction related to treatment: The new Urologist that fixed me up is fantastic, as is the Nephrologist I see.

    • Roger Low, MD says:

      Stephanie:

      I am happy to hear that you had a good experience. Your experience is typical. Indwelling ureteral stents are associated with causing blood in the urine, cramping of the bladder and feeling like one needs to urinate. Typically these symptoms improve after the first two day.

  6. Tom says:

    I have found that medical care with regard to urology seems to be limited to a fairly universal protocol. Having gone through this several times (I am a chronic stoner… Make alot, pass alot, often multiples [20-30] at a time, and large stones [8-12mm is not unusual, hightest retrieved was 19mm] ) I been through this many times:
    1.) you go to first visit (usually referred from an ER), they agree it is a stone, they give you painkillers, maybe nausea medication maybe antibiotics and tell you to drink lots of fluids and strain your urine.
    2) two weeks you have either passed it, or they start talking about films and surgery (usually Lithotripsy)… if not , one -two more weeks, more meds, and off you go.
    3.) next trip, either passed, or scheduled for lithotripsy.
    4>) Surgery competed, stent inserted (which is incredibility for me) and see them in two weeks.
    5.) Stent removed, urologist accepts all the praise, roses fall from the sky, music plays… life is back to normal…. or it’s not.

    That has been my problem. I don’t fit the classic profile of a stone patient. I certainly don’t have the room here to discuss the treatment I have received at the hands of these pathetic medical creatures. Let’s leave is like this… I have been accused of being a liar, I cannot be trusted, I am an addict, I could have gotten these stones I am showing them from my back yard (even though the CT shows tons… and that’s just for starters.) so I guess I have given you some idea as to how I feel about urologists.

  7. Ahmed Saber says:

    I want to Urology Consultants in a hospital , for simple in infection in the Bladder. I end up with 3 surgeries , I pain still , stone in the kidney still there , they cut my both ureters , they cut my Bladder in 2 half’s , now I am with 2 pouch on my sides and catheter .
    The medical industry need a revolution and soon .

  8. Dr. Roger Low says:

    Charlie:
    Your experience though frightening (and painful) is not uncommon. Typically, the pain and anxiety caused by an obstructing stone is severe and debilitating. Fortunately for most patients their pain improves and their stone either passes or can be treated non urgently. The use of the medication flomax is suggested for small stones capable of passage < 10 mm in size. Interestingly, hydration or drinking lots of fluids is recommended by many health care providers but there is little scientific evidence that hydration influences stone passage. Hydration clearly has a role in prevention of future stones. The presence of fever, insufficient kidney function, or symptoms poorly controllable with oral medications typically requires seeking urgent referral to a urologist who often would intervene to either treat the stone or relieve the blockage caused by the stone at that time. Roger Low, MD

  9. Roger Low says:

    Adrian:

    Your experience highlights a number of principles. Although there are a number of different imaging options to evaluate patients with stones, non contrast ct represents the most accurate modality. There has a been a recent concern over the overutilization and cost of ct. Newer ct protocols minimizing radiation exposure are being investigated and practiced at many institutions. Most kidney stones are calcium based and detectable on plain xrays. Some stones are known to be difficult to see on plain xrays and usually are composed of uric acid or cystine.

    The use of tamsulosin or flomax now is commonly recommended to facilitate passage of ureteral stones. This medication also has been shown to be helpful controlling people’s pain. Potential limiting side effects include light headedness or dizzness and men can expect that their ejaculate volume will decrease while on the medication.

  10. Adrian says:

    After having pain and visible blood loss on and off for about 6 months (and nothing being spotted on ultrsound or IVU) I had a 6mm stone identified by CT scan at the outlet to my left Kidney. My consultant advised that I take one 400mcg Tamsulosin capsule daily. The drug widens the tubes from the Kidney and bladder (they’re meant to treat the symptoms of an enlarged prostate). They caused a few mild side effects but I was amazed that after about 4 weeks, largely pain free, I suddenly passed the stone; more uncomfortable than painful (although I did load up on pain killers when I thought it was on its way!) and no blood. I’d had a smaller stone (about 4.5mm and very jagged) about 14 years ago that had to be removed so I was very pleased with the outcome this time round.

    • Charlie Bates says:

      I just had my first stone an it was 4.5mm an jagged. After being very sick vomiting for 8 hrs. Off an on we went to hospital to see what the hell was going on with me. Was so painful I was whinning like a lil baby. They took me right in an did a ct scan an found it was enlogged in my right kidney. They said that they only do surgery if 7 or more mm. So they gave me flomax an said to drink plenty of water. So I did that day must of drank 2 gallons an the next day I heard a plop. there it was. Gone an I hope I never get another one. Thought I was going to die.

  11. leslie smith says:

    We just found out today that my sister age 46, is losing a kidney, from a stag horn stone, 16 months ago she went to urologist (after being deathly ill in er, said huge stone a long with infection) and they told her needs to be taken care of. BUT BUT, turned her down because of no insurance, and no money to put down on surgery, they literally made her fill out paper work ect for help from this hospital, but never excepted her, now today (new Dr.) after scan told her her kidney is atrophic and dying, I am one mad sister. Because of this Urologist, medical office turned her way, and they treated her very unprofessional. She found a more caring Urologist 16 months too late. I am so angry, this is sooooo wrong.

  12. leslie smith says:

    We just found out today that my sister age 46, is losing a kidney, from a stag horn stone, 16 months ago she went to urologist (after being deathly ill in er, said huge stone long with infection) and they told her needs to be taken care of, BUT BUT, turned her down because of no insurance, and no money to put down on surgery, they literally made her fill out paper work ect for help from this hospital, but never excepted her, now today (new Dr.) after scan told her her kidney is atrophic and dying, I am one made sister. Because of this Urologist, medical office turned her way, and they treated her very unprofessional. She found a more caring Urologist 16 months too late. I am so angry, this is sooooo wrong.

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