Kidney stone gallery

We’ve gathered a collection of kidney stone pictures in this photo gallery. The stones include small passed stones up to large staghorn stones. Stone composition (or type) is indicated when available.

Photo of kidney stone fragments

3 stone fragments that were removed during percutaneous surgery.

Photo of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate kidney stone

A 7 mm stone successfully passed by a patient. Comprised of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate.

Photo of calcium oxalate kidney stone fragments

Fragments of an orginally 1.1 cm stone treated with laser lithotripsy and removed during ureteroscopy. Comprised of calcium oxalate.

Photo of kidney stones removed percutaneously

A 1.4 cm and a 5 mm stone removed percutaneously from a kidney.

Photo of carbonate apatite kidney stones

Collection of carbonate apatite stones removed percutaneously from a kidney.

Photo of uric acid kidney stones

2mm and 4mm uric acid stones removed with ureteroscopy.

multiple kidney stones

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multiple large smooth kidney stones removed percutaneously from a single kidney. Largest stone measures 1.2 cm in size. Analysis demonstrated 70% calcium oxalate monohydrate and 30% calcium phosphate.

small-kidney-stones

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multiple small kidney stones with the appearance of bird seed. Removed with ureteroscopy from a single kidney. Largest stone measured 4mm in size. Analysis demonstrated 85% calcium oxalate monohydrate and 15% calcium phosphate.

Photo of large bladder stones

File photo of large bladder stones removed by open incision. These have a “jackstone” appearance.

Photo of staghorn kidney stone

File photo of a large “staghorn” kidney stone removed intact by open surgery. The various parts of this stone fill up an entire kidney’s central collecting system, giving it a characteristic shape appearing similar to a deer’s antlers. Stones this size are not commonly seen intact anymore as most are now treated percutaneously and broken up before being removed.

Photo of staghorn kidney stone

File photo of another large “staghorn” stone removed by open surgery.

 

216 Responses to Kidney stone gallery

  1. kimmi says:

    I have hyperparathyroidism as Mary Ellen described. One of the parathyroid glands is making my calcium levels too high. I just passed an 8mm stone last night after 11.5 hours of pure discomfort and 3 hours of a near death experience and nearly overdosing myself at home. I passed out from the medication and when I woke up it just passed and we’ve been celebrating ever since. Ironically we were scheduled for surgery 2 days ago but I fell ill to a viral infection and had to reschedule.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>