Kidney stone gallery

We’ve gathered a collection of kidney stone pictures in this photo gallery. The stones include small passed stones up to large staghorn stones. Stone composition (or type) is indicated when available.

Photo of kidney stone fragments

3 stone fragments that were removed during percutaneous surgery.

Photo of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate kidney stone

A 7 mm stone successfully passed by a patient. Comprised of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate.

Photo of calcium oxalate kidney stone fragments

Fragments of an orginally 1.1 cm stone treated with laser lithotripsy and removed during ureteroscopy. Comprised of calcium oxalate.

Photo of kidney stones removed percutaneously

A 1.4 cm and a 5 mm stone removed percutaneously from a kidney.

Photo of carbonate apatite kidney stones

Collection of carbonate apatite stones removed percutaneously from a kidney.

Photo of uric acid kidney stones

2mm and 4mm uric acid stones removed with ureteroscopy.

multiple kidney stones

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multiple large smooth kidney stones removed percutaneously from a single kidney. Largest stone measures 1.2 cm in size. Analysis demonstrated 70% calcium oxalate monohydrate and 30% calcium phosphate.

small-kidney-stones

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multiple small kidney stones with the appearance of bird seed. Removed with ureteroscopy from a single kidney. Largest stone measured 4mm in size. Analysis demonstrated 85% calcium oxalate monohydrate and 15% calcium phosphate.

Photo of large bladder stones

File photo of large bladder stones removed by open incision. These have a “jackstone” appearance.

Photo of staghorn kidney stone

File photo of a large “staghorn” kidney stone removed intact by open surgery. The various parts of this stone fill up an entire kidney’s central collecting system, giving it a characteristic shape appearing similar to a deer’s antlers. Stones this size are not commonly seen intact anymore as most are now treated percutaneously and broken up before being removed.

Photo of staghorn kidney stone

File photo of another large “staghorn” stone removed by open surgery.

166 Responses to Kidney stone gallery

  1. Ronald Staszewski says:

    I was 18 when I passed my 1st,then again at 30.AFter that the stones would come like 2to 3 a month,I am now 51 and still continue to pass at least 2 every month sometimes more.STones run in my family.My stones are calcium oxilate and phosphate.

  2. Daniel Chapman says:

    They said that people that have stones should take Magnesium tablets to prevent and remove stones but magnesium also depletes Zinc in the process so take magnesium and zinc together. I have had pain since march 2014 and it is now Sept 2014 its taken this long just to get an ultrasound. It all started when i got back pain and shortly after that i had a really bad fever, feeling achy and on the way home from work I felt like I was having an outer body experience, like I was there but all i could hear was myself thinking I needed to get of the bus. As soon as i got off the bus I threw up and felt somewhat better but still dizzy and out of it. As soon as I got home I jumped into a very hot bath (no cold water) and stayed there for about 20 mins. I got out and stumbled to the bedroom trying not to be sick and laid on the bed, didn’t even try to dry myself off. For 3 days I was bed ridden and didn’t eat

    All the time my genital area was red and sore and swollen, I was peeing every 5 mins which hurt, my Prostate blew up so i couldn’t pee and i also found that i couldn’t pass stools. My urine was also cloudy and smelt like the male urinals in a nightclub. now all of a sudden the pain has moved from my prostate area and is now effecting my vas deferens and it also starting to affect the dimples of my lower back like i have been bent over for a while and then got back up and it hurts (you know what i mean) hoping this is a sign that its coming out. I have spent the last 3 weeks thinking that it got stuck in the bladder. I have been taking a mixture of Ibuprofen, Paracetamol, magnesium and zinc tablets all at once. lets hope it is a stone that’s passing.

  3. BK says:

    I wish no body to feel a kidney pain due to that I live it every day and I know how painful
    it sounds

  4. terri says:

    I just passed my 10th stone. I have had 3 stents and dr says i have more. They don’t know what to do either. It is very frustrating.

  5. Caroline burris says:

    For those of you that think you are too young, I am female, Caucasian and had my first at 17! Thought I was dying! I do have a family history and have had my stones tested and produce two different kinds. Unbelievably, I had a bad one and had to go to the er 3 weeks ago, took the pain mess and back in the er 4 days later. They did a CT scan and I had 6 stones they thought! Turns out I passed 4, two quite large, all on my right side. Passed at home just staying on the pain meds. Now this past week, I had one on my left! Ugh! Had 30 while pregnant with my son, the nurses wanted me to name home Stone!

  6. Rob says:

    Hello.

    My story goes like this. About two weeks ago I started getting a dull ache in my lower left flank. I went to urgent care where they took a urine sample and put me on Bactrim because of blood in my urine. Saw my GP a the following Monday who had me take an Xray. Next day they called and sent me for an ultrasound, still don’t know cause of pain. During ultrasound the technician spent allot of time inserting arrows on image but would not offer me ANY info on what she had seen (said only a Dr. can tell me)….. ugggg.
    Waited 4 DAYS to hear about results from the Ultrasound and that was from my Dr’s nurse telling me I’d been referred to a Urologist for possible kidney stones….. I haven’t been given a date yet to see the Urologist yet but nurse also gave me a perscrip for Flowmax and Norco pain killers. I started the Flowmax 2 days ago and really havent noticed anything different. I don’t take the Norcos because I don’t have serious pain, just an ache in my left flank. I’m also a little swollen on the left side too. The only other problem I have is not being able to comfortably sleep at night.
    I work outside in the sun and I know probably don’t drink enough water all the time. But sometimes when It’s really hot I’ll drink 2 gallons of water and not pee one time, I just sweat like crazy… Any one else have similar situation? I’m almost hoping this is a stone and not something worse…

    • Kathy says:

      Hi Rob!

      I’m in similar situation. Same symptoms. Have had ongoing uti infection for one month due to stone. Starting my second antibiotic. Not a lot of pain, but blood in my urine (sometimes I can’t see it, the docs just tell me after the urine test). Waiting to see urologist. Had CT scan. Am wondering why you didn’t get a CT scan. Everything I have read says this is the definitive test for stones. I have two large ones which will probably need removal as well as a few small ones. Also have Rx for pain, but don’t need it…yet. So, they didn’t TELL you that you had stones? If you do pass your stone make sure you keep it. That way they can analyze what it is composed of. It will help you to know so that you can alter your diet and they will be able to adjust your treatment accordingly. Good Luck! I’d be pushing for an appointment with that urologist. Seems to take forever! As far as drinking enough water, oh BS. I get most of my calories through liquids and look where I am! Think some people are just predisposed to these things.

  7. Danica Kaesemeyer says:

    I have passed 21 stones since I passed my very first stone in March of 2013. The doctors have no clue why I am getting them and have no clue what I should do to prevent them. Does anyone else have multiple stones with no answers? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    • Samantha Lawrence says:

      I have no idea if this will help you. But, in 2007 my uncle had severe back problems, he finally decided he couldn’t live with the pain & agreed to surgery. In the several months leading up to his surgery, he had 14 kidney stones. His neurologist attributed the KS’s he was having to his back problems, he explained that his body was attempting to fuse his back on its own, by creating excess calcium. However, that didn’t work, so all the excess calcium his body was creating would be sent to his kidneys, thus causing all of his KS’s. The neurologist who did my uncles surgery is one of the best neurosurgeons in the country. So my uncle believed that very well might have been what was causing his stones. Since he is the best, he should certainly know what he’s talking about, lol! The neurosurgeons claims were confirmed, since his surgery, ha has had no kidney stones! Like I said, I have no idea if this could be a possibility in your situation. But I thought I’d tell you about my uncles experience, on the off chance it may help! :)

    • Samantha Lawrence says:

      I have no idea if this will help you. But, in 2007 my uncle had severe back problems, he finally decided he couldn’t live with the pain & agreed to surgery. In the several months leading up to his surgery, he had 14 kidney stones. His neurologist attributed the KS’s he was having to his back problems, he explained that his body was attempting to fuse his back on its own, by creating excess calcium. However, that didn’t work, so all the excess calcium his body was creating would be sent to his kidneys, thus causing all of his KS’s. The neurologist who did my uncles surgery is one of the best neurosurgeons in the country. So my uncle believed that very well might have been what was causing his stones. Since he is the best, he should certainly know what he’s talking about, lol! The neurosurgeons claims were confirmed, since his surgery, ha has had no kidney stones! Like I said, I have no idea if this could be a possibility in your situation. But I thought I’d tell you about my uncles experience, on the off chance it may help!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>